Posts Tagged ‘trees’

Friday, October 11th, 2013
5.0.2

Crab apple blossoms along the Oconaluftee River, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina 1992

 

During Sierra Art Trails this past weekend, we had three ladies walk into my living room display of prints. One of them looked at the first print by the door, a 30×40 inch print of this image, gasped, and then tears of emotion flowed from her eyes she was so inspired by the print. We talked a bit, she asked about the print’s price, and we showed her a smaller print. After browsing a while, she and her friends left. The next day, she returned to buy the small print. She said she would hang it where she could see it everyday.

Of course, I was deeply moved by this reaction. I have had a long and blessed career, but sometimes it seems like a never-ending marathon to keep business going. This weekend I was reminded that sharing the beauty I find is such an honor and privilege. My passion for “landscapes of the spirit” lives on, inspired by the beauty around us everyday, and by when my imagery connects my experience to others.

Captured with my 4×5 camera in 1992 using a 120mm film back.

Enjoy and please share!

Cheers,  Bill

Redbud, Merced River Canyon, 2012

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM__1.5 sec at f / 22__ISO 100

 

As with my previous post, this photograph was made last Sunday on my Earth Day return to nearby Merced River Canyon, my home for 20 years.  I love the change of seasons there, but the spring season is my favorite.  Many seasons, the flowers start blooming in February, and finally all turns brown in May.  Besides the flowers, the river is exhilarating in its moods, especially during the high waters of spring.  In my El Portal home, I could see the river from my living room only in the height of the spring runoff.  Its rumbling sound was very loud, and soothing, at night.

I had never photographed this tree before, but noticed these branches on Sunday while zooming past on the road.  The sun was too harsh at the time to stop, but I made note of it for later.  A few hours later, we returned as the sun was about to go down.  I worked with this composition for about one hour, taking many variations.  There was about 10-15 minutes when the light became warm as it passed behind a cloud on the horizon.  I positioned myself for good spacing of the branches, and so the glow in the sky reflected off the water.  I tried several shutter speeds in order to ge the best sharpness in the branches and sense of motion in the river.

I’ve made many images in the Merced River Canyon over the years, and one of my favs was of a special tree overhanging the river.  Below is my favorite redbud image from the MRC.  This tree is now gone, damaged by the 1997 flood and subsequent road repair.

I love my new Redbud image.  Which do you prefer?

 

Redbud and Merced River, Merced River Canyon, California 1989

Oaks and Fog, Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park, Ahwahnee, California 2012

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Last week, we had some wonderful mornings of fog at sunrise. After dropping my son off at school, I walked into the nearby field of Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park. This image continues my Morning Light series, most of which I’ve photographed after taking my kids to school!  I will have one or two more to share from this morning, as soon as I find time finish post-processing…  Let me know your thoughts.

Enjoy!  Bill


Oaks and Fog, Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park, Ahwahnee, California 2012
Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM,
1/125 second at f/16, ISO 100
Copyright © 2012 William Neill

Other Morning Light images:

Late Summer Meadow, Ahwahnee, California 2011

Spring Oak, Coarsegold, California 2011

Buckeye, Foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California 2011

Sunbeams and Forest, Sierra Nevada Foothills, California 2010

Autumn oak and snowstorm, Ahwahnee, California 2010

Waterfall and Sunbeam, Sierra Nevada Foothills, California 2011

Morning Fog and Oaks, Ahwanhnee, California 2011

New Morning Light Image – Spring Oak, Coarsegold, California 2011

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

This morning, I photographed a wonderful spreading oak tree with brilliant morning sunlight.  Since the contrast was strong and I was aiming into the sun, I made seven exposures with .5 stops between frames.  After importing the files in Lightroom, I applied the Lens Correction for my Canon 16-35mm zoom, then exported to Nik HDR Efex Pro.  I just started using this software so am slowing learning the many processing options it offers and exploring its potential for me. So far, so good!

Enjoy!  Bill

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF16-35mm f/2.8L II USM___ISO 160

Editing recent photo sessions…

Sunday, April 10th, 2011

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM__1/2 sec at f / 8.0__ISO 100

I am trying to catch up with processing all the images I’ve made in the last few months.  It has been a very productive time for me! Here is one taken on February 2o. I have already posted another image from this session, but I made a quick edit initially so I felt the need to dig back through the captures to see what else was was there.  This is an important process for all of us photographers, because we can generate so many versions of any given composition that we can’t digest them all in one or two editing sessions.

I will post two here for your review and comparison.  The  top image is newly post-processed, and the bottom photograph was posted on Facebook in February.  For both images, I used my trusty Singh Ray Vari-ND in order to use slow shutter speeds.  Your thoughts are welcome.

Enjoy,  William Neill

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New Morning Light image – Buckeye, Foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California 2011

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM__1/3 sec at f / 19__ISO 200

I have lived in the Sierra for 33 years, and I have always been thrilled when seeing the first buckeyes popping out in early spring.  The leaves come out so fast that I have never caught that moment I have enjoyed for so many years.  The bare branches of these small trees often have wonderful patterns that I have photographed during the winter months.  See one such image on mine on the OP site:  The Digital Deluge.

I have been wanting to capture that sense of early spring that I have seen and felt every spring for so long.  The timing for this image was critical – early enough in the budding process to still see the branch patterns and also see the full, radiating shapes of the leaves.  On Tuesday morning, on my Morning Light run, I think I captured the moment.

Enjoy!  Bill

Aspen in late afternoon light, Conway Summit, California 2010

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM__1/125 sec at f / 16__ISO 400

Aspen in late afternoon light, Conway Summit, California  2010

I have been neglecting my blog lately due being too darn busy!  To see my most recent posts and images, also check here:  William Neill Photography

Here is a new image, made last Friday afternoon.  It was  simply gorgeous, with amazing clouds over the Sierra peaks freshly counted with a fall snow.

I was working against windy conditions, and the aspen were moving most the whole session.  I turned up my ISO so I could use a shutter speed to spot the leaf action.  This was the reason I took a few hundred frames here, which also included 7 frame brackets when including the very bright clouds.  Started using Nik’s HDR Effect today, which looks great so far.  I will post images soon.

Enjoy!  Bill

If you haven’t already, check out my latest ebook:

William Neill’s Yosemite: Volume One

Painted Bark

Monday, March 1st, 2010

Painted bark eucalyptus, the Hana Coast, Island of Maui, Hawai

John and I have been working on more scans from my 4×5 film archive.  It has been rewarding to finally make use of these images, but also frustrating to see how many good images are languishing in my filing cabinets.  I have also been placing new images on my Facebook Fan page.  I look forward to your comments here or on the Fan Page!

Enjoy,  Bill

PS  On March 10th, my next 4-Week BetterPhoto.com begins!
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Red Maples and forest, autumn, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee

Foggy sunrise

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

Here is another image from Monday morning.  I took seven frames, each one stop difference, and my assistant John assembled them using Lightroom and Photomatix’s Lightroom plugin (http://www.hdrsoft.com/).  This was taken with my Canon 16-35mm as the sun rose through the fog.  The tree behind the big oak were heavily tilted due to the convergence caused by aiming upward with 22mm of focal length!  I raced back to my car (yes, I should have had my camera bag next to me!) to get my 24mm Tilt Shift lens, which I used in the previously posted image.  To correct for the distortion of the trees, I asked John to straighten up the trees.  Instead of using Photoshop’s Lens Correction tool, he used the Crop tool, with Perspective box checked.  John writes about using this tool in this blog post, at the bottom of the page:  Breaking the Funk/Meditations on a Moment Blog.

Let me know if you have a favorite between the two Sunrise Fog images!

Bill

ONE ON ONE WORKSHOPS

The bark of a Gumbo Limbo tree, Everglades National Park, Florida

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

The bark of a Gumbo Limbo tree, Everglades National Park, Florida

The bark of a Gumbo Limbo tree, Everglades National Park, Florida

Photographed in 1992 with a Wista 4×5 Field Camera

John and I continue our efforts to scan film in my files. Here is an old favorite, never scanned or printed before.  I must credit Eliot Porter for the inspiration as I first learned of this tree and its amazing bark from a photograph of his.

I am starting to develop an idea for a new portfolio that includes my more abstract details of nature.

The 4×5 film was scanned using my Epson Perfection V750 Pro.

Enjoy,   Bill

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