Posts Tagged ‘sunrise’

Oaks and Fog, Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park, Ahwahnee, California 2012

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Last week, we had some wonderful mornings of fog at sunrise. After dropping my son off at school, I walked into the nearby field of Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park. This image continues my Morning Light series, most of which I’ve photographed after taking my kids to school!  I will have one or two more to share from this morning, as soon as I find time finish post-processing…  Let me know your thoughts.

Enjoy!  Bill


Oaks and Fog, Ahwahnee Hills Regional Park, Ahwahnee, California 2012
Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM,
1/125 second at f/16, ISO 100
Copyright © 2012 William Neill

Other Morning Light images:

Late Summer Meadow, Ahwahnee, California 2011

Spring Oak, Coarsegold, California 2011

Buckeye, Foothills of the Sierra Nevada, California 2011

Sunbeams and Forest, Sierra Nevada Foothills, California 2010

Autumn oak and snowstorm, Ahwahnee, California 2010

Waterfall and Sunbeam, Sierra Nevada Foothills, California 2011

Morning Fog and Oaks, Ahwanhnee, California 2011

Sunrise Storm Clouds, Mono Lake Tufa State Natural Reserve, California 2010

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro__1.0 sec at f / 19__ISO 200

Sunrise Storm Clouds, Mono Lake Tufa State Natural Reserve, California 2010

The morning after I photographed at Conway Summit, I got up early to photograph sunrise on Mono Lake.  I have been photographing the lake since the late 1970s, and my first published photo was for the Mono Lake Committee in 1980, which has been instrumental in preserving the Mono Lake ecosystem.

As you can see, I was blessed with a colorful and dramatic sunrise.  As with the previously posted aspen photo from Conway Summit, I used two exposures in a seven stop bracket and blended them in Photoshop CS5.  In order to preserve any detail in the bright strip of sky on the horizon, I had to underexpose several stops below the meter’s reading.  That one very dark exposure was blended with a more “average” exposure, which had all the details I needed in the rest of the scene.

Enjoy!   Bill

William Neill eBooks