Posts Tagged ‘Antarctica’

The Long Road

Friday, August 4th, 2017

 

Introductory Essays by Art Wolfe and John Weller

Size: 280mm x 280mm (11×11 inches)

Pages: 214

Photographic Illustrations: 151

Available: October, 2017
Standard Edition £49.50 ($64.00 USD)

YOUR own poetic sensibility has greatly enhanced your ability to create realities that transcend surface realities… Your images have a presence that very few photographers achieve.
 -Jerry Ueslmann

There is wonder all around us; William Neill translates it all
into photographic poetry
-Art Wolfe

William Neill is one of the great landscape photographers of the last hundred years. His images – stunning, haunting, breathtaking, poetic – speak for themselves. There are no words necessary, just admiration. Through, in his own words, “observation and immersion” he has seen and recorded the beauty of the planet. But, more than that, he had captured its spirit. Again and again he shows us “the thread which holds all things together”.
This book is an instant classic; truly one for the ages.
– Dewitt Jones

William Neill has been an inspiration to me since my earliest days photographing the American West. His quiet and thoughtful compositions always inspire contemplation and solace.
-Guy Tal

During a recent workshop someone asked me about my favorite photographers, and one of the first names that came to mind was my friend William Neill. Bill has been producing consistently beautiful and innovative photographs of nature for decades,
and his new retrospective book looks wonderful.
-Michael Frye

Though Bill is a consummate artist, his drive is not to create art. Bill’s drive is to communicate the importance and fragility of nature. He does so through intimate details and sheer majesty. But photography, for Bill, is not the end in and of itself, but a means to his end, a tool. He has devoted all of his unique skill, and his entire life, to connecting people
with our endangered natural world.
 -John Weller

William Neill is widely recognized as one of America’s finest landscape photographers. Widely published and exhibited, his work is truly inspirational.
-Michael Reichmann, 2008

Neill is a master who has been an inspiration to me for over two decades. His images have a delicate elegance that few others achieve.
-Sean Bagshaw

 

The Long Road
(originally published at The Luminous Landscape)

We all walk the long road. Sometimes the light is all shining on me, sometimes I can barely see. What a long strange trip it has been, on this long and winding road. These lines from classic rock and roll songs pop into my head as I try to write about my four decades as a landscape photographer. You may ask yourself, how did I get here?

When I was growing up, my family often spent time outdoors. On weekends, we’d picnic in local redwood forests or beaches near our home in the San Francisco Bay Area. During most summers, we’d spend a week or two visiting National Parks such as Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, Sequoia or Yosemite. These family road trips sparked my love of nature.

This passion became solidified in the face of personal tragedy when I was eighteen. While working a summer job in Glacier National Park before starting college in the fall, I learned that my brother had died of a brain aneurism. My immersion in that mountainous landscape during a time of great personal distress opened my eyes to the restorative powers of nature, and led me to a life in photography. At some deep level, the beauty of my surroundings seeped into my subconscious—the lush colors of a meadow dense with wildflowers, the energy of a lightning storm, the clarity of a mountain lake. In an effort to capture and convey these life-affirming discoveries, I began to photograph as I backpacked throughout Glacier. Within a few years, all I wanted to do was make photographs!

 

Just a few years after buying my first camera in 1974, I moved to Yosemite and never left. Living in or just outside the Park continuously since 1977 has been key to my development as an artist. After a few summers working for the National Park Service, I was hired to be the photographer in residence at The Ansel Adams Gallery. I was able to get to know Ansel and attend his workshop summer sessions; meet other world-class photographers such as Ernst Haas, Paul Caponigro, Joel Meyerowitz and Jerry Ulesmann plus Ansel’s stellar assistants John Sexton, Alan Ross, Ted Orland and Don Worth. I started teaching photography to park visitors, taking them for daily “camera walks” in the meadow near the gallery. I learned to make my own color prints, ironically, in Ansel’s Black and White darkroom. I listened and learned and explored.

As my career developed over the past 40 years, through many ups and downs financially and creatively, I slowly found a few key themes. (See: Thinking in Themes essay) Naturally, one of those themes was Yosemite. Through my connection to Ansel’s sphere of influence, I was inspired to discover new ways of seeing this grand landscape. I hiked and camped and climbed on my weekends, always with a camera. In 1994, a book of my Yosemite photographs was published entitled Yosemite: The Promise of Wildness.

 

Along this road, a new theme emerged that focused on intimate landscapes, isolations of the broad view. Rather than try to describe everything in front of me, I searched for simple design and magic light that moved me, and the viewer, beyond a literal description. “Landscapes of the Spirit” became the central theme in my landscape photography, and the theme took form in a major monograph book (in 1997) of my best photography to that date.

My new book begins with a large portfolio of my Landscapes of the Spirit series. It includes key images made with my 4×5 film camera, but also very recent digital captures. There are also chapters featuring my Antarctic work, Black and White images, impressionistic photographs each reflecting creative tangents I’ve taken.

 

Another chapter includes a portfolio entitled By Nature’s Design. From the very beginning of my photography, portraying nature’s patterns was a main subject for me. The theme took full form in 1993 when I illustrated a science book entitled By Nature’s Design. I was assigned to photograph dozens of specific subjects to artistically and clearly show branching, cracking, and spiral patterns to illustrate the science behind them. A large portfolio of the book’s images appeared in the October 1993 issue of Life Magazine.

The lesson of working with concepts to bring deeper meaning to my portfolios led to new themes. The Black and White images emerged from a long-standing love of the images by Edward and Brett Weston, Paul Caponigro, Minor White, and Wynn Bullock. Seeing the paintings of Monet and other Impressionists inspired my Impressions of Light collection of photographs using the technique of intentional camera motion to create painterly images.

 

One never quite knows where the road of life leads us. With a great sense of wonder, a passion for making photographs, and a desire to celebrate nature’s beauty, I’ve stayed focused on the task at hand, the goal in mind, moving forward one step at a time. Now, I can stop for a moment, look back at the path I’ve traveled, as seen in the pages of this book, and breathe a deep breath of satisfaction. Now looking forward, head down again and back to work. The long and winding road continues before me.

 

The book includes a full index of each image, showing the camera and lens used.

 

 

For more information and to purchase, visit Triplekite’s website.

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Text Box (I see the text below as a separate box to give your reader a direct sense of what the publishers were thinking about this book project)

As my conversations with Triplekite’s David Breen and Dav Thomas developed, I shared my book publishing history with them as well as the portfolios on my web page. To my surprise, they suggested a retrospective. It was a daunting prospect, but who was I to say no? Here is a brief Q&A with the publishers:

From the Publisher

What is your philosophy as a book publisher specializing in landscape photography?

“Our philosophy has always been to make the books that we would want to buy – which is also why we started; we simply couldn’t find many publishers making photography books of the natural world in any great quantity. We knew some great artists who couldn’t get a traditional book deal and self-publishing was pretty much a dark art, so we decided to make a stand against the traditional publishing world and prove it could be done in a newer, fresh and more personal way. Of course, things have changed radically in the five years since we started, but our philosophy stays the same – make great books, by great people, and they will sell. We have always been passionate about the product, its design as well as the content within it. We always strive to make a book which best represents the work within, that on occasion has meant books the size of an A2 sheet when opened out, or with quad foldouts over a metre wide. We still strive for these ideals as well as showcasing the best work, whether that’s from an established name or a relative newcomer, some of our greatest pleasure is derived from publishing someone for their first book.”

Why William Neill, and why a retrospective?

“William is, of course, a household name when it comes to Landscape photography, so maybe the question is ‘why wouldn’t we?’ Within our philosophy it is easy to see who we could and should be publishing, and it is often more difficult to see a way of making it viable – a relatively unknown artist will take a lot of marketing if we are to reach beyond break even and often we don’t. More established names are easier to make commercial decisions with but often are already tied into established publishing houses and contracts. When we approached Hans Strand about doing his “Iceland” book, we found a perfect mix of great work, great desire and a willingness to take a chance on a lesser-known publisher in ourselves. William was sent this book by Hans and really liked what it stood for, so he approached us about doing a book together. I remember looking through everything he’d already achieved and once over the awe of it all, thinking he’s never done a complete collection. I guess the idea came from there, and we have worked for a couple of years trying to capture the essence of a career which is beyond measure in its achievements and outputs.”

How did you learn about his photography?

“Personally, I originally knew more European photographers than Americans (apologies), but in my research, I have looked at all the great landscape artists throughout the world. Williams name comes up time and time again in my investigations. Doing polls of our book buyers, and his name comes up, he’s very much respected and followed across the globe and our pre-orders show that.”

 

Can you give us some insight into the design process?

“The design process starts with an evaluation of the images that will form the content of the book, followed by a rough idea of how to sequence the images. In this case, William already had a rough idea of sections for the book which covered both individual styles as well as locations. The physical format of the book is often guided by the proportions of the images it is to showcase – early on in the design process we decided that a square format would work best in this instance. 


Covers were designed early on including the limited edition options and this was followed by the layout including type choice and image spacing. 


After a number of draft versions, with slight alterations to the sections and image selection, we end up with a final version ready for artwork
.”

 

For more information and to purchase, visit Triplekite’s website.

Retrospective book now available to pre-order!

Friday, March 10th, 2017
This is the cover for the standard version, 20% during pre-order, available in the Fall.Standard Release Cover, available Fall 2017, pre-0rder 20% off now for only £40 (~$49US)

Greetings from the Sierra Nevada,

I am happy to share with you the pre-order information about my upcoming book. The collection will feature images, many never published before, from my very early years with a camera in the 1970s through four decades including very recent work created in the past year. Photographs included are: from my Antarctica series; an in-depth look at my “landscapes of the spirit” work; a Black and White portfolio; a series of patterns in nature imagery; a portfolio of my impressionistic, camera motion work; and last but not least, an extensive collection of Yosemite photographs.

The book’s release is scheduled for the Fall of 2017. Triplekite, the publisher, is now offering excellent upgrades to the standard hardcover version that are only available through them and only until publication in the fall. Don’t miss out on these very special and limited offers!

William Neill’s much-anticipated retrospective book is now available to pre-order. All books ordered before the general release in the Autumn will come with a limited edition cloth cover with foil embossing – this version of the book will only be available as a pre-order and will not be available once the book is on general release. We are also offering a limited edition slipcase version, plus special edition with one or two signed A3 (12×16 inches) prints. 
All slipcased, limited and special edition books will only be available as pre-orders.

For more information and to purchase, visit Triplekite’s website.

special edition william neill-retrospectivePre-Release edition: Cover: cloth cover, foil blocked, set-in image:
approx 300 Plates: TBC Size: 280mm x 280mm (11×11 inches)
Pre-order book with slipcase £57.50 ($70.00 USD)

 

William Neill – Photographer, a Retrospective

£49.50£195.00 £40.00£195.00

Released: Autumn 2017

ISBN: 978-0-957 6345-8-9

Release edition: Cover: Hardback cover printed directly with no dust jacket, matt laminated Pages:  TBC Plates: TBC Size: 280mm x 280mm

Pre-Release edition: Cover: cloth cover, foil blocked, set-in image:  approx 300 Plates: TBC Size: 280mm x 280mm (11×11 inches)

 

Reasons to pre-order:

Name printed in the book

Collectors edition cover

Slipcases and special editions only available until pre order closure

20% Reduced pricing

Pre-order book only  £40 ($49.00 USD)
Retail Price when available in bookstores or online  £49.50 ($60.00 USD)

Pre-order book with slipcase £57.50 ($70.00 USD)

 

Special Edition with one print £160 ($195.00 USD)

In limited edition slipcase with signed A3 print (12×16 inches) by William Neill

Special Edition A – with ‘Rock, Tree and Waterfall’, Yosemite National Park, California

Special A Rock,-Tree-and-Waterfall,-Yosemite-National-Park,-California

Special Edition B – with ‘Morning Mist Rising’, Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

Special B-Morning-Mist-Rising,-Yosemite-Valley,-Yosemite-National-Park,-California

Special Edition with both prints £195 (~$230.00 USD)

Special Edition C – with both  ’Rock, Tree and Waterfall’, Yosemite National Park, California  &  ’Morning Mist Rising’, Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California

To make your purchase, you will see the drop down menu where you can select the options as shown below.

New eBook! Antarctic Dreams

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

 

I am happy to announce the publication of my new ebook, Antarctic Dreams, in digital form. I traveled to Antarctica in January 2014, and it is rewarding to have finally produced a portfolio of my favorite images. The book was designed in Adobe Lightroom, with file sizes that have been optimized to preserve the high resolution images files. The quality of the images really comes to life on screen. I know that this isn’t the same tactile experience of holding a book in hand, but it’s hard to dismiss the vivid quality one can enjoy on screen.

Antarctic Dreams – Digital Edition is delivered as two PDF files. One PDF contains single pages for viewing on an iPad, tablet, or other digital device and so is optimized for viewing the individual images, as well as for reading text. The second PDF shows the two-page spreads, allowing you to enjoy the book as it was originally designed.

I hope you enjoy my new book, which features 79 photographs and essays about my amazing photographic journey.  Please share this with your friends and fellow photographers!

 

 

Price: $15.00!    Click Here To View Sample Pages and Purchase

 

Antarctic Dreams – a developing portfolio Part Two

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

As many of you might have noticed, I returned three weeks ago from an amazing adventure:  Antarctica By Air – A Unique Luminous Landscape Photographic Workshop with Michael Reichmann and Kevin Raber.

Here is a set of ten new images.  In spite of all the energy I have been putting into editing and processing in the past three weeks, I am shocked and thrilled that I still have many strong images to “finish” and present to you.

I would enjoy your comments and feedback on this selection.  When I have another set of newly processed images, I will let you know!  Also, as new images are created, I am adding them to my Facebook pageGoogle+ or 500px.

Enjoy, and if you Like, please Share!


Ancient crystal Iceberg, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/750 second at f/16, ISO 1600

 


Glowing Glacier, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/8000 second at f/11, ISO 1600

 


Icebergs, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/3000 second at f/11, ISO 800

 


Icebergs and Sunset, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x III,
1/3000 second at f/5.6, ISO 800

 


Mountain and Iceberg at Twilight, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x III,
1/500 second at f/5.6, ISO 400

 


Iceberg Detail, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/350 second at f/9.5, ISO 400

 


Iceberg Arch, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/500 second at f/9.5, ISO 400

 


Cliffs and Glaciers at Sunrise, Neumayer Channel, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/750 second at f/11, ISO 500

 


Icebergs, Neumayer Channel, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/250 second at f/19, ISO 500

 


Mountains and Glaciers, Scontorp Cove in Paradise Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/1500 second at f/16, ISO 800

Antarctic Dreams – a developing portfolio

Saturday, February 15th, 2014

Antarctic Dreams – a developing portfolio

I recently returned from an amazing adventure:  Antarctica By Air – A Unique Luminous Landscape Photographic Workshop with Michael Reichmann.

Only three weeks before departure, I was asked to replace an instructor who was unable to go.  Lucky me.  We photographed for five days, and I made 10,000 frames.  I know this amount sounds ridiculous, but the days were very long, the quality of the landscapes and wildlife was epic, and the shooting conditions difficult as we were often photographing from our zodiacs or the ship.  I photographed all images without a tripod, and with little time to deliberate on each composition.  Handholding and using two cameras, one with wide-angle zoom and another with a telephoto zoom, was a constant struggle.  And out of my comfort zone.

I have been editing and post-processing at a frenetic pace, anxious to see, begin to absorb and interpret all that I saw.

Here is a collection of 20 images, chosen only by my spontaneous leaping through my Lightroom catalog.  I am thrilled with the results, but I have a long way to go in my editing.  I plan to develop a portfolio of 40-50 images for a potential ebook, gallery prints and exhibits.

I would enjoy your comments and feedback on this selection.  When I have another set of newly processed images, I will let you know!  As new images are created, I am adding them to my Facebook page, Google+ or 500px.

Enjoy!

Bill


Blue Iceberg, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/500 second at f/22, ISO 1600


Crystal Iceberg detail, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/250 second at f/22, ISO 1600


Two Humpback Whales and Iceberg, Cierva Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/1500 second at f/11, ISO 800


Chinstrap Penguin, Hydrurga Rocks, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/180 second at f/19, ISO 800

 


Penguin at Dawn, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014 January 30, 2014 05:12:32
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/500 second at f/6.7, ISO 800


Iceberg at Dawn, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
January 30, 2014 05:37:39
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/2000 second at f/2.8, ISO 400


Iceberg formations, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula 2014 January 30, 2014 05:54:08
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/350 second at f/8, ISO 400


Iceberg Towers at Dawn, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
January 30, 2014 05:58:54
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/4000 second at f/2.8, ISO 400


Iceberg Sculpture, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
January 30, 2014 21:50:21
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/125 second at f/19, ISO 800


Sunset, Pléneau Bay, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014 January 30, 2014 22:04:34
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/1500 second at f/6.7, ISO 800


Sunrise, Neumayer Channel, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014 January 31, 2014 05:18:22
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/250 second at f/13, ISO 1250


Morning Light, Neumayer Channel, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014 January 31, 2014 07:10:43
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM,
1/250 second at f/13, ISO 200


Glacier, Paradise Bay, Antarctic Peninsia, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/6000 second at f/6.7, ISO 400


Glacier and mountains, Scontorp Cove in Paradise Bay, Antarctic Peninsia, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/3000 second at f/6.7, ISO 400


Calving Glacier, Scontorp Cove in Paradise Bay, Antarctic Peninsia, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4x III,
1/6000 second at f/9.5, ISO 800


Gentoo Penguins and solar halo, Cuverville Island, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF16-35mm f/2.8L II USM,
1/250 second at f/22, ISO 100


Gentoo Penguin and two chicks, Cuverville Island, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x III,
1/1000 second at f/9.5, ISO 400


Gentoo Penguin colony, Cuverville Island, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM,
1/250 second at f/32, ISO 400


Chinstrap Penguins, Baily Head on Deception Island, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x III,
1/500 second at f/11, ISO 800


Icebergs at Sunset, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica 2014
Canon EOS 5D Mark III, EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +2x III,
1/8000 second at f/5.6, ISO 800