Archive for the ‘The Ansel Adams Gallery’ Category

ANSEL ADAMS GALLERY EXHIBIT: LIGHT ON THE LANDSCAPE November 17th – January 4th

Saturday, November 16th, 2019

Spring storm, Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California 1986

 

Aspen in winter, Conway Summit, Inyo National Forest, 1995

PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT: LIGHT ON THE LANDSCAPE
November 17th – January 4th

Since 1983, when Ansel approved my work for sale in his gallery, I have been exhibiting my fine art prints there. This has been a great honor for me, with 15+ shows over those many years. I’ve chosen this exhibit’s title to be Light On The Landscape as it is also the title of my forthcoming book by the same name. You can read more about the book below.

Starting soon after the first of the year, a pre-order sale of a limited number of signed hardbound editions will be made available by the publisher Rocky Nook on their website. I will be offering some form of deluxe edition for direct sale only. Softbound is expected to be $45 and the hardbound $55. I will announce the details when the pre-order is launched so stay tuned to my social media or sign up for my occasional newsletter HERE.

I will be attending the opening reception to be held on Saturday, November 23rd from 1-3 pm.

Kind regards, William Neill

FROM THE GALLERY:
In 1977, photographer William Neill found his life’s path when he moved to Yosemite to work for the National Park Service. Not long after this, he began working at The Ansel Adams Gallery as a staff photographer, teaching visitors all he could about the art form and the place that he loved. Mr. Neill has said that: “Perhaps one of the greatest joys of being a photographer to me is to see the light on the landscape, seeing its daily cycles change with each season and shift with each day’s weather. I revel in the light. I am its disciple.” While other itinerant interests would take him on adventures far and wide, from the American Southwest to the Himalaya to Antarctica, he would make Yosemite his home.

His life in photography has been an amazing journey as witnessed by the incredible and intimate imagery that has resulted, as well as the numerous books and articles written in the process. Between November 17th, 2019 and January 4th, 2020, The Ansel Adams Gallery will be exhibiting “Light on the Landscape – Photographs by William Neill” featuring work made throughout an illustrious career.

A reception with the artist will be held on Saturday, November 23rd from 1-3 pm, on what will no doubt be a beautiful autumn day in the park!

LIGHT ON THE LANDSCAPE

Saturday, August 31st, 2019

Spring storm, Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California 1986

I am happy to announce my next book!

LIGHT ON THE LANDSCAPE: Photographs and Lessons from a Life in Photography.

To be published by Rocky Nook in the spring of 2020. A collection of photographs and essays based on my On Landscape column for Outdoor Photographer Magazine.

FROM THE PUBLISHER:

“For more than two decades, William Neill has been offering his thoughts and insights about photography and the beauty of nature in essays that cover the techniques, business, and spirit of his photographic life. Curated and collected here for the first time, these essays are both pragmatic and profound, offering readers an intimate look behind the scenes at Neill’s creative process behind individual photographs as well as a discussion of the larger and more foundational topics that are key to his philosophy and approach to work.

Drawing from the tradition of behind-the-scenes books like Ansel Adams’ Examples: The Making of 40 Photographs and Galen Rowell’s Mountain Light: In Search of the Dynamic Landscape, Light on the Landscape covers in detail the core photographic fundamentals such as light, composition, camera angle, and exposure choices, but it also deftly considers those subjects that are less frequently examined: portfolio development, marketing, printmaking, nature stewardship, inspiration, preparation, self-improvement, and more. The result is a profound and wide-ranging exploration of that magical convergence of light, land, and camera.

Filled with beautiful and inspiring photographs, Light on the Landscape is also full of the kind of wisdom that only comes from a deeply thoughtful photographer who has spent a lifetime communicating with a camera. Incorporating the lessons within the book, you too can learn to achieve not only technically excellent and beautiful images, but photographs that truly rise above your best and reveal your deeply personal and creative perspective—your vision, your voice.”

Protecting Place

Sunday, July 14th, 2019


Eroded Navajo sandstone slot canyon, Antelope Canyon Tribal Park, Arizona 2002
Wista 4×5 Metal Field Camera

NOTE: The original version of this essay was written and published in Outdoor Photographer Magazine in 2002 after a recent visit.

I first visited Antelope Canyon in 1982, when only a very few photographers had discovered the remarkably-carved sandstone slot canyon. I happened to have seen some of the first published photos of slot canyons ever published, which intrigued me greatly. Some years later, and without planning to seek them out, I saw photographs in a nearby visitor center, I asked for directions and was drawn a simple map. I parked my car along the highway as directed. No signs or markers were to be found. Hoping that I was heading in the right direction, I shouldered my heavy pack and hiked up the wash. I had no clear idea of how far the slot was or how I would get into it when I got there. After a few miles, I could see the sides narrow down to a sandstone cliff with a slot in it. I entered this unknown space with a sense of mystery and discovery.

I spent hours within the sculpted walls, completely in awe, and completely alone. Well, except for a raven cawing eerily from somewhere above my head. The few images I had previously seen did not prepare me for what I saw and felt. Here was the Sistine Chapel of natural sculpture. The profound art of Creation.

At the end of that extraordinary day in Antelope, I heard a truck driving up the sandy wash. I was a bit worried. I didn’t know if I belonged there. The people from the truck seemed surprised to see me, with my 4×5 camera, recording the slot canyon. Worried and protective, they asked me what I planned to do with my images. I told them I would label my photographs vaguely if they were published, in hopes of protecting the canyon from becoming well known. In a fine bit of irony, these were the folks who had led me to the site with their published photographs!
NOTE: A new book “Searching for Tao Canyon” chronicles their explorations starting in the early 1970s.
Searching for Tao Canyon By: Pat MorrowJeremy SchmidtArt Twomey

I returned home with a few decent images, two of which are included here. Some were published, some I printed for display in galleries or were shown to workshop students, but I never labeled the location specifically, only “Slot Canyon, Arizona” or something. I was often pressed for more specific directions, and I gave as few hints as possible. I was torn between the desire to share such a treasure, and the same territorial feelings felt by those early photographic explorers of Antelope. At the same time, other photographers were discovering, and publishing images of the slot canyons. The secret was getting out.

We must all think carefully about the impact of our images.  Does publishing our work outweigh the possible impact the exposure might bring?  Can we depend on resource managers to protect delicate or overused landscapes?  Is nurturing the love of nature’s treasures through our photographs more critical, and worth the risk? These are important questions, for which I have no definitive answers.

Just the other day, I received my copy of a travel magazine that reaches several million readers.  On the cover was a beautiful image of a very sensitive area, which had already been a subject of vandalism, with its location clearly defined.  I cringed and could only pray more damage would not result from the added attention.  In spite of this quandary, I am hopeful that when images are published of delicate places, others that follow will tread lightly and become involved in its protection.

NOTE: Here are two nature photography organizations involved in protecting nature and encouraging safe and ethical standards for nature photographers.
Nature First https://www.naturefirstphotography.org/
North American Nature Photography Association http://www.nanpa.org/

 


Side Canyon, Arizona 1982
Wista 4×5 Metal Field Camera


Slot Canyon, Arizona 1982
Wista 4×5 Metal Field Camera

Springtime in Paradise

Sunday, May 12th, 2019

During the last few weeks, I’ve visited Yosemite Valley several times and I’d like to share my new images with you. Having lived in or nearby the Valley for forty years, it would be all too easy to become jaded or bored photographing the small area for so long. Over the course of a year, I really don’t visit that often. However, whenever I go I find something amazing and wonderous to see, and sometimes photograph. When sharing this beauty with my students, I reengage with and refresh my long love affair with this sanctuary, this paradise.

I hope you enjoy this collection, and that you’ve had a chance to engage with springtime in your areas. Please let me know your favs and add your comments below!

Kind regards, Bill

PS To learn more about my Yosemite Private Workshops, click HERE.


Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/1600 second at f/18, ISO 400

 


Dogwood and Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/6 second at f/18, ISO 100

 


Waterfall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/2 second at f/20, ISO 100

 


Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/1000 second at f/18, ISO 100

 


Horsetail Fall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/800 second at f/18, ISO 100

 


Moon over Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/25 second at f/5.6, ISO 400

 


Dogwood along the Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/3 second at f/16, ISO 100

 


Spring sunrise over Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/40 second at f/11, ISO 100

 


Spring Elm, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM,
1/20 second at f/14, ISO 100

 


Upper Yosemite Fall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/1600 second at f/5.6, ISO 200

 


Waterfall and Mist, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/1600 second at f/7.1, ISO 200

 


Dogwood over the Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/6 second at f/22, ISO 100

 


Rock and Waterfall, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/2 second at f/32, ISO 100

 


Spring dogwood, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/2 second at f/18, ISO 100

 


Spring dogwood and Merced River, Yosemite National Park, California 2019
Sony ILCE-7RM2, FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS,
1/2 second at f/25, ISO 100

 

Come join me for a private workshop session in Yosemite!

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019

Autumn Elm and Sunbeams, Cook’s Meadow, Yosemite National Park, California 2014

 

Rock and Water, Cascade Falls, Yosemite National Park, California 2011 / Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III__EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM__1/2 sec at f / 27__ISO 320

Rock and Water, Cascade Falls, Yosemite National Park, California 2011

I have been running my Yosemite Private Workshops for ten years now. Although I taught group workshops around the world starting in the early 1980s, I have greatly enjoyed the one-on-one sessions and personal connections I’ve had while showing my approach to landscape photography in my beloved Yosemite Valley.

The best times to come photograph YV are the last two weeks of April and the first two weeks of May, or the end of October or the first two weeks of November.

Here are a few endorsements from past students:

Bill Henderson:      My William Neill workshop experience was exceptional! The most significant outcome was the change in perspective. Bill finds images everywhere, his ability to see photographically is something you can’t learn from reading, it’s a gift from many years of hard work and study. This is what I found so interesting and helpful.

Now I didn’t walk away with his skill, but I learned something significant that has stayed with me. I still find that workshop useful today.”

Rick Hardt:      “I have always been drawn to Bill’s work, because I think he leads the pack in the arena of “Less is More”.  His images define the idea of “Clean and Simple”.  Through that perspective, he communicates powerful feeling that I don’t often see in other areas.

He is extremely present and open during the process.  What I felt from him was kindness and patience.  I never felt judged for my lack of experience or ability.   Seeing through his eyes for subject matter and lighting really opened my eyes to things that I’d completely missed before.

In the end, I walked away with a pocket full of images that I cherish to this day, AND a much better understanding of how to get more on my own.

Lastly and most importantly, the conversations that we had during those times, often come to mind when I’m in the field looking for new images. 

I continue to get benefit from a class that I took some time ago.  Amazing.

 

Bob Cole:    “I greatly appreciated the personal attention Bill provided in our two-student, two-day Private Workshop. The limit to one or two students is a significant advantage. There were many other photography workshops happening in Yosemite Valley at the same time, with van loads of students for one or two instructors. Bill’s Private Workshops are simply superior in the personal attention he provides.

                The Private Workshop provided a great opportunity to explore Yosemite beyond the obvious icons. Bill provides a wealth of information about the Yosemite environment and history. Understanding the place is important to helping one see the what is really there beyond the often photographed icons. This leads to more photographic possibilities. Bill helps the student “see” nature in new ways that translate into stronger, more creative photographs.

                I created better images during the two-day Private Workshop, and that improvement continued after it was over. When I consider the many ways photographers spend their resources on cameras, lenses, other gear, software, and travel, I can think of no more effective way to improve one’s photography than the William Neill Private Workshop.

 

Antoinette Addison:      “I have done a couple of private workshops with Bill in Yosemite. It was incredible. First, his knowledge of the Yosemite area allowed him to put us in the right place at the right time throughout the day.  We moved through the valley with the light, not just to the well-known photo spots, but all over the place. I thought I knew the area quite well, but I discovered many new, hidden spots. We would find ourselves at the perfect spot over and over throughout the day. It was incredible. 
         We took different kinds of photos in different areas, from classic landscape shots to black ice photos, close-ups, impressions. It was magical. Bill helped me make subtle technical and positioning adjustments that made a big difference and brought my photography to a new level.
        The portfolio review was also useful, educational, and inspirational. I could not recommend these workshops more strongly.
Brad Rank:     “My personal workshop with William was a surprise birthday gift from my Wife.  At the time I was just starting with a DSLR, only a short time from upgrading from simply using an iPhone for my photography.   I learned from the internet, and there is so much advice as to equipment, settings, composition, etc.  It was overwhelming and I was concerned about having the “right” thing and being such a novice working with such a professional as William.    We started our day shooting at Tunnel View and he says to me to change my camera settings for “bracketing”, and I pulled out my manual.  I think he knew then what he was in store for in the day as there was no hiding my lack of experience, and I was bracing for his response.   In that moment, he had the ability to negatively or positively impact my relationship to photography.  He could have said I had the wrong equipment or that I’m unprepared, or many many things, but he choose patience,  he choose kindness, he taught.  As I got to know him better through the day, I realized that this wasn’t a choice, it’s just who he is; a great photographer, but also a great teacher.  I learned so much about photography that day and my confidence rose dramatically to not worry about the rules and the prescribed “noise” of what should be done.  However, the most impressive thing I learned was about the man, his vision, relationship to the natural world around him, and his joy to pay it forward from his experiences as well.  Whether a beginner or a professional you will learn something.

 

See this link to see details, instructional content options discounts for small groups or multiple day sessions:

Private Yosemite Sessions

Instructional Content Options

William teaches simple ways to capture quality images in order to focus more on your expressive vision. These methods are what he uses for his own photography. Potential topics to be covered include:

Improve your Creative Vision

Learn to see deeply, to convey your emotional connection with the subject

Exposure Techniques
Using Histograms, HDR, Long Exposures

Composition
How to create clean, well-balanced designs without distractions

Planning Your Photographic Sessions
When to photograph and where, weather and seasonal considerations

Photo Critiques of New and Previous Images
Learn about your strengths and areas for improvement in your prints and downloaded digital files from field sessions.

Digital Camera Workflow
Basic and Advanced Techniques in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop

Photograph with William in Yosemite
Guidance while you photograph with in-field suggestions
Explore alternate perceptions and locations

Watch and ask questions as he selects and photographs Yosemite subjects.

Techniques in Impressionistic Photography
Learn how to create “light paintings” with intentional camera movement. William will demonstrate how he creates his Impressions of Light” photographs, and guide you with your efforts in the field.